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dc.contributor.authorPsotka, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-12T19:52:05Z
dc.date.available2013-08-12T19:52:05Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1436-4522
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1524
dc.description.abstractNew technologies often have the potential for disrupting existing established practices, but nowhere is this so pertinent as in education and training today. And yet, education has been glacially slow to adopt these changes in a large scale way, and innovations seem to be imposed mainly by students’ and their changing social lifestyles than by policy. Will this change? Leadership is sorely needed. Education needs to become more modular and move out of the classroom into informal settings, homes, and especially the internet. Nationwide certifications based on these modules would permit technology to enter education more rapidly. Smaller nations may be more flexible in making these very disruptive changes.es_ES
dc.description.tableofcontentsEducational Technology & Society, 16(2), pp. 69–80es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherIEEEes_ES
dc.subjectTecnología de la informaciónes_ES
dc.subjectRealidad virtuales_ES
dc.subjectAprendizaje en líneaes_ES
dc.titleEducational Games and Virtual Reality as Disruptive Technologieses_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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