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dc.contributor.authorRoth, Wolff-Michael
dc.contributor.authorJornet, Alfredo
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-15T14:54:55Z
dc.date.available2014-07-15T14:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1098-237X
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.minedu.gob.pe/handle/123456789/2917
dc.descriptionScience Education, Vol. 98, No. 1, pp. 106–126es_ES
dc.description.abstractExperience is one of the most used terms in (science) education, and it is recognized as being related to learning (education). Yet what experience is and how it is related to learning and change remains untheorized. In this paper, we mainly draw on the work of J. Dewey and L. S. Vygotsky but also on M. Bakhtin and more recent advances on the topic of experience from French philosophy to contribute to a theory of this important category. Accordingly, experience is not something that belongs to or is had by individuals but rather denotes transactions in and across space and time within irreducible person-in-setting units; and it is perfused with an affect that is not (only) the result of mental constructions. An episode from an Australian physics classroom is used to exemplify what such a theory and its method-related implications have to accomplish in the analysis of concrete science lessons.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonses_ES
dc.subjectEnseñanza de las cienciases_ES
dc.subjectAprendizaje activoes_ES
dc.titleToward a Theory of Experiencees_ES
dc.typePaperes_ES


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