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dc.contributor.authorOECD. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:22:38Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:22:38Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.isbn978-92-64-20809-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3104
dc.description.abstractPISA 2012 results show wide differences between countries in mathematics performance. The equivalent of almost six years of schooling, 245 score points, separates the highest and lowest average performances of the countries that took part in the PISA 2012 mathematics assessment. The difference in mathematics performances within countries is even greater, with over 300 points – the equivalent of more than seven years of schooling – often separating the highest- and the lowest-achieving students in a country. Clearly, all countries and economies have excellent students, but few have enabled all students to excel. The report also reveals worrying gender differences in students’ attitudes towards mathematics: even when girls perform as well as boys in mathematics, they report less perseverance, less motivation to learn mathematics, less belief in their own mathematics skills, and higher levels of anxiety about mathematics. While the average girl underperforms in mathematics compared with the average boy, the gender gap in favour of boys is even wider among the highest-achieving students. These findings have serious implications not only for higher education, where young women are already underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields of study, but also later on, when these young women enter the labour market. This confirms the findings of the OECD Gender Strategy, which identifies some of the factors that create – and widen – the gender gap in education, labour and entrepreneurship. Supporting girls’ positive attitudes towards and investment in learning mathematics will go a long way towards narrowing this gap. PISA 2012 also finds that the highest-performing school systems are those that allocate educational resources more equitably among advantaged and disadvantaged schools and that grant more autonomy over curricula and assessments to individual schools. A belief that all students can achieve at a high level and a willingness to engage all stakeholders in education – including students, through such channels as seeking student feedback on teaching practices – are hallmarks of successful school systems.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherOECDes_ES
dc.subjectPresupuesto educativoes_ES
dc.subjectFinanciamiento de la educaciónes_ES
dc.subjectFinanzases_ES
dc.subjectEvaluación de la educaciónes_ES
dc.subjectEvaluación del rendimiento escolares_ES
dc.titlePISA 2012 Results : Students and Money. Financial Literacy Skills (Volume VI)es_ES
dc.typeBookes_ES


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