Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMiller, Sebastián J.
dc.contributor.authorCaruso, Germán
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-11T16:05:42Z
dc.date.available2015-06-11T16:05:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3573
dc.description.abstractThis study estimates the effects of the 1970 Ancash earthquake on human capital accumulation on the affected and subsequent generation, 37 years after the shock, using the Peruvian censuses of 1993 and 2007. The main finding is that males affected by the earthquake in utero completed on average 0. 5 years less schooling while females affected by the earthquake completed 0. 8 years less schooling. Surprisingly, those whose mothers were affected at birth by the earthquake have 0. 4 less years of education, while those whose fathers were affected by the earthquake at birth have no effects on their education. The evaluation of other outcomes also suggests that the level of welfare of the affected individuals has been negatively impacted in the long run. The present investigation supports previous literature on shocks in early childhood, providing evidence of the existence of intergenerational transmission of shocks.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherBIDes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDB Working Paper Series;535
dc.subjectDesastres naturaleses_ES
dc.subjectTerremotoes_ES
dc.subjectÁncashes_ES
dc.subjectEvaluación de impactoes_ES
dc.subjectTasa de matriculaciónes_ES
dc.subjectTrauma emocionales_ES
dc.titleQuake'n and Shake'n...Forever! Long-Run Effects of Natural Disasters: A Case Study on the 1970 Ancash Earthquakees_ES
dc.typeWorking Paperes_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record