Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOECD. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T17:01:08Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T17:01:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.minedu.gob.pe/handle/MINEDU/5888
dc.description.abstractIn 2015, a majority of countries and economies that participated in PISA compensated disadvantaged schools with smaller classes and/or lower student-teacher ratios. However, in more than a third of countries and economies, teachers in the most disadvantaged schools were less qualified or less experienced than those in the most advantaged schools. Gaps in student performance related to socio-economic status were wider in countries where socio-economically disadvantaged schools employed fewer qualified and experienced teachers than advantaged schools. Greater school autonomy for managing teachers is associated with more equitable sorting of teachers across schools.es_ES
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherOECDes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPISA in Focus;85
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.sourceMINISTERIO DE EDUCACIÓNes_ES
dc.sourceRepositorio institucional - MINEDUes_ES
dc.subjectEvaluación PISAes_ES
dc.subjectEvaluación de la educaciónes_ES
dc.subjectEducación secundariaes_ES
dc.subjectEficacia del docentees_ES
dc.subjectComprensión lectoraes_ES
dc.subjectTamaño de la clasees_ES
dc.subjectDiscriminación educacionales_ES
dc.titleIn which countries do the most highly qualified and experienced teachers teach in the most difficult schools?es_ES
dc.typeReporte técnicoes_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record